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"Focused on Ending Violence"

WIN provides Refuge, Empowerment and Restoration to families affected by domestic violence in Hunt and Rockwall County.

“Together we are making a difference”

Education & Prevention

Through community presentations, newspaper articles, radio spots and educational programs, knowledge of the problem of family violence and its solution are creating social change.

We see education as the key to awareness and prevention of domestic violence and its dynamics.

Community Presentations:

Looking for someone to speak about domestic violence to your church, social, civic, or business group? WIN community education coordinators can talk about the work being done through our services as well as our client and staff needs regarding volunteers and resources. We also offer training to a wide variety of occupations wanting to know more about domestic violence, its effect and help for its victims. Teachers, law enforcement agents, business owners, clergy, and health care workers are some of the groups that can benefit from training.

Teen Dating Violence Prevention Programs:

WIN provides prevention programs for local middle and high schools that focus on dating abuse and how to prevent it.

To schedule a speaker contact WIN's Executive Director Connie Pettitt:

Hunt County: (903) 455-4612 
Rockwall County: (972) 772-3000

Did You Know…?

  • Physical and sexual abuse against adolescent girls in dating relationships increases the likelihood that the girl will abuse drugs and/or alcohol, develop an eating disorder, consider and/or attempt suicide, engage in risky sexual behavior and/or become pregnant.
  • Hitting your girlfriend or boyfriend is a crime.
  • 40% of teenage girls ages 14 to 17 report knowing someone their age who has been hit or beaten by a boyfriend.
  • Violent relationships begin at an average age of 15.
  • 1 in 3 teenagers experiences physical violence in their dating relationships.

Signs of Abuse

  • Jealousy
    Questions the victim about her conversations, accusations of flirting, jealous of time spent with family, friends or children, repeatedly checking on her whereabouts or asking friends to watch her.
  • Controlling Behavior
    Questions where she went or who she talked to, controlling decisions regarding the house, clothing or finances, restricting her ability to leave the house, excessive texting, calling or emailing.
  • Quick Relationship Involvement
    Comes on like a whirlwind, says, you’re the only person I can talk to” or “I’ve never loved anyone this much,” pressures the woman to commit.
  • Unrealistic Expectations
    Very dependent on the woman for all his needs, expects a perfect wife, mother, lover, and friend, expects her to take care of everything involving their home and his emotions.
  • Isolation
    Attempts to cut the woman off from all her resources, accuses her supporters of “causing trouble”, restricts access to a car, or keeps her from working or going to school.
  • Blames Others for His Feelings
    uses his feelings to manipulate the woman ¬ “you made me mad,” “you made me hit you,” or “I can’t help being angry with you”.
  • Hypersensitivity
    Easily insulted, claims his feelings are hurt when he is really mad, takes slight setbacks as personal attacks, rants, and raves about the injustice of what has happened to him.
  • Cruelty to Animals or Children
    Punishes animals brutally or is insensitive to their pain or suffering, expects children to do things beyond their abilities, teases children until they cry, isolates children from the rest of the family.
  • Playful Use of Force in Sex
    Holds the woman down during sex, acts out fantasies where the woman is helpless, the idea of rape excites him, manipulates the woman into compliance, demands sex when she is ill or tired, unusual interest in or addiction to pornography.
  • Verbal Abuse
    Cruel or hurtful remarks degrades the woman, diminishes accomplishments, name¬calling, wakes her up to continue the verbal abuse.
  • Rigid Gender Roles
    Expects a woman to serve him, insists she stay in the home at all times, he is the boss and she must obey him in all things, sees women as inferior to men.
  • Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde
    Sudden changes in mood, nice one minute then explodes the next. Nice outside of the home, convincing others he is charming and the perfect mate, but angry, defensive and critical behind closed doors. Friends often have a difficult time believing the same person could have such opposing behaviors.
  • Past Battering
    Has hit women in the past, but they “made him do it,” has a history of fighting or violence outside the family, a record of trouble with the police.
  • Threats of Violence
    Any threats of physical force used to control the woman.
  • Breaking or Hitting Objects
    Used as punishment (breaking her possessions) or to terrorize the woman into submission.
  • Any Force During an Argument
    Holding a woman down, physically restraining her from leaving, pushing or shoving as a means of control.

The Cycle of Violence: 
Phase I
Tension Building
Phase II
Abusive Incident
Phase III
Honeymoon Period

Domestic Violence is not just a one-time incident, but a pattern of behaviors over time. 

 Most abusive relationships follow a cycle of violence, which has three stages: tension building, explosive incident, and honeymoon stage. 

 The lengths of each stage can vary from seconds to years.  

 During the Tension Building Phase:   The warning signs of abuse begin to appear. They may repeat, they may change each time, but they are there. 

 There are more arguments between the abuser and the victim. 

  • The abuser yells at the victim for no apparent reason. 
  • The abuser accuses the victim of acts they did not do, such as sleeping around, flirting with other people, cheating. 
  • The victims feel as if they cannot do anything right, and are afraid to do anything to make the situation worse. 

During the Abusive Phase, the abuse occurs. It may be mental, physical, or sexual, but it is always an intense outburst.

 The abuser threatens the victim with physical violence.

  • The abuser hits, grabs, shoves, kicks, or otherwise physically attacks the victim.
  • The abuser screams and yells violently.
  • The abuser throws objects across the room.
  • The abuser injures a family pet.
  • The abuser rapes or sexually assaults the victim.

During the Honeymoon Phase, the abuser tries to justify or minimize the abuse. They may treat the victim with extreme kindness as they try to "make up" for the attack and try to keep the victim from fleeing. 

 The abuser may also try to make the victim feel responsible for the abuse, so they will not blame the abuser or press charges.

 The abuser apologizes and promises that it will never happen again. 

  • The abuser tells the victim they love them.
  • The abuser buys the victim gifts, such as flowers or jewelry, to "make up" for the abuse.
  • The abuser makes excuses for the abuse, often blaming the victim for the abuse ("you made me do it", "it was only a little slap, it's not like I really hurt you", "you know that always makes me angry", "you know how stressed I've been lately because of work", and many others).

Sign of Domestic Violence:  

 As a cycle, the phases repeat themselves: after the honeymoon stage, the tension eventually starts building again, which leads to another explosive incident. 

 Over time, the tension building phase takes less time to lead to the explosion, which becomes more violent and dangerous, and the honeymoon stage becomes shorter and shorter.

 Domestic violence is not always easy to recognize, but the signs are usually there. Abuse can be in many forms, from emotional to physical to sexual.

 The following are some of the signs that the person you are with may be abusive:

 The person...

 Repeatedly lies to you and breaks promises.

  • Withholds affection in order to get power over you.
  • Shows extreme jealousy and tries to keep you from family, friends, or interests.
  • Insults or puts you down.
  • Violates your privacy, goes through your possessions without permission.
  • Threatens you.
  • Tries to control you, telling you how to dress, where to go, what to eat, what to do, etc.
  • Attempts to cause you pain or injury.
  • Punches, kicks, shakes, slaps, or restrains you.
  • Attacks you with a weapon or thrown objects.
  • Causes pain or injures you.
  • Forces their attention on you, either verbally or physically.
  • Sexually abuses you.
  • Injures or threatens to injure the family pet.
  • Threatens to injure your children.
  • Injures your children.

The Cycle of Violence: 
Phase I
Tension Building
Phase II
Abusive Incident
Phase III
Honeymoon Period

Domestic Violence is not just a one-time incident, but a pattern of behaviors over time. 

Most abusive relationships follow a cycle of violence, which has three stages: tension building, explosive incident, and honeymoon stage. 

The lengths of each stage can vary from seconds to years.  

During the Tension Building Phase:

The warning signs of abuse begin to appear. They may repeat, they may change each time, but they are there. 

  • There are more arguments between the abuser and the victim. 
  • The abuser yells at the victim for no apparent reason. 
  • The abuser accuses the victim of acts they did not do, such as sleeping around, flirting with other people, cheating. 
  • The victims feel as if they cannot do anything right, and are afraid to do anything to make the situation worse.

During the Abusive Phase, the abuse occurs. It may be mental, physical, or sexual, but it is always an intense outburst.

 

  • The abuser threatens the victim with physical violence.
  • The abuser hits, grabs, shoves, kicks, or otherwise physically attacks the victim.
  • The abuser screams and yells violently.
  • The abuser throws objects across the room.
  • The abuser injures a family pet.
  • The abuser rapes or sexually assaults the victim.

 

During the Honeymoon Phase, the abuser tries to justify or minimize the abuse. They may treat the victim with extreme kindness as they try to "make up" for the attack and try to keep the victim from fleeing. 

 

The abuser may also try to make the victim feel responsible for the abuse, so they will not blame the abuser or press charges. 

  • The abuser apologizes and promises that it will never happen again. 
  • The abuser tells the victim they love them.
  • The abuser buys the victim gifts, such as flowers or jewelry, to "make up" for the abuse.
  • The abuser makes excuses for the abuse, often blaming the victim for the abuse ("you made me do it", "it was only a little slap, it's not like I really hurt you", "you know that always makes me angry", "you know how stressed I've been lately because of work", and many others). 

Sign of Domestic Violence:   

As a cycle, the phases repeat themselves: after the honeymoon stage, the tension eventually starts building again, which leads to another explosive incident.  

Over time, the tension building phase takes less time to lead to the explosion, which becomes more violent and dangerous, and the honeymoon stage becomes shorter and shorter. 

Domestic violence is not always easy to recognize, but the signs are usually there. Abuse can be in many forms, from emotional to physical to sexual. 

The following are some of the signs that the person you are with may be abusive: 

The person... 

  • Repeatedly lies to you and breaks promises.
  • Withholds affection in order to get power over you.
  • Shows extreme jealousy and tries to keep you from family, friends, or interests.
  • Insults or puts you down.
  • Violates your privacy, goes through your possessions without permission.
  • Threatens you.
  • Tries to control you, telling you how to dress, where to go, what to eat, what to do, etc.
  • Attempts to cause you pain or injury.
  • Punches, kicks, shakes, slaps, or restrains you.
  • Attacks you with a weapon or thrown objects.
  • Causes pain or injures you.
  • Forces their attention on you, either verbally or physically.
  • Sexually abuses you.
  • Injures or threatens to injure the family pet.
  • Threatens to injure your children.
  • Injures your children.